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20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
. this is "your money." only in america can you grow talent like this. we like to think of america as innovation nation. but the numbers reveal a slogan that should read, "part-time america." >>> call it the do you want fries with that economy? part-time jobs have exploded, nearly doubling since 2007. 8.2 million americans who would rather have a full-time job punching the time clock part-time instead. president obama admits there is more work to do, but is his signature achievement, obamacare, partly to blame? >> more companies have said because of this law they'll have to shift full-time workers to part-time. >> reporter: team retailer now the latest company demoting some full-time workers to part-time not because of obamacare, it's just good business. the teamsters sending a letter to world leaders saying they could destroy the foundation of the 40-hour work week that is the backbone of america middle class. a middle class in trouble with 14,000 other americans forced to take part-time gigs since march. whatever the reason, the numbers don't lie. is america becoming a nation of part-timers? t
as highly discriminatory. what politicians decide to do about it but putting corporate america in a tough spot. an article in the new yorker this week titled "why the olympic sponsors should take action on gay rights." richard is a political strategist and gay rights advocate. bob zito is with us and he helped shape the brands of sony, new york stock exchange, bristol-myers squib. you write the participation of corporate sponsors mostly benefits the russian government. it's not required for american athletes to succeed. they sign deals before president putin signed that law. what do you think these corporate sponsors need to do now? >> i think the point is, right, that no one wants to penalize the athletes who worked so hard to succeed and most people believe we should participant. the corporate sponsors because they donate sod much money to the games, that they have earned the right to insist that russia comply with the policies that these corporations, most of these corporations have for their own employees of non-discrimination. i think that they have a lot of -- they have the power of
, and this is "your money." are we one america with two economies? america is the land of opportunity, right? >> you can choose policies that invest in our middle class and create new jobs and grow this economy so that everybody has a chance to succeed. >> that was 2008. four and a half years later, the president's supporters are wishing for a little less hope and a little more change. >> doing nothing doesn't help the middle class. >> so what's the president doing? four speeches in seven days. >> if folks in washington really want a grand bargain, how about a grand bargain for middle class jobs? >> but while washington waits for a bargain, millions of american workers feel they're getting a raw deal. fast food workers across the country who say they can't afford to live where they work, walking off the job to demand higher wages. now the economy is adding jobs, but those new jobs pay less than the ones lost during the recession. the president worries the growing income gap will fray america's social fabric. even the good news isn't as good as it seems. amazon adding 5,000 warehouse jobs. the compan
to america's reality. millions still feel like they are missing out on the recovery. so when will it be their turn? christine romans has answers. "your money" starts now. >>> the american dream, happiness and prosperity. a house, a great job, maybe a couple of kids and time to enjoy it all. the great recession is behind us, but the recovery isn't so great. i'm christine romans and this is "your money." first, housing. goldman sachs says all cash deals are half the market right now. wealthy investors, buyers from china, canada, south america, pumping up recent housing data. average americans may be getting priced out. in the second quarter, when you look at this, more than two-thirds of all the homes sold in the u.s. were affordable. for families making $56,000 a year, that's the median u.s. income. but you can see how that affordability is falling. next, the labor market. nearly 5 million net new jobs have been created near the end of the recession four years ago, but look at the jobs that were lost. mostly middle wage jobs right here, and the jobs we're creating, mostly lowe
problem in america is the system is not producing right people. there's plenty of jobs for sophisticated manufacturing, technical training, either vocational training that's high end, running numerical control milling machines. they're in short supply. in oil and gas production, energy, technology is being held back by americans who can't do this. you fix it by offering more education. >> at what point will it ever be just not on the margin, that we're making high-tech things in the united states but there really will be a manufacturing sur jens especially in the consumer tech of big, big numbers of jobs? >> it's going to be hard for the very high volume commodity stuff. frankly it's easier to be done. those are not the high value jobs anyway. we're losing low value and gaining high value jobs. that's the great american story. it's completely dependent upon education and investment. we can do this. >> you've also said, here we have this trend in america where we bring in the best and brightest in the world. then you say, thanks, see you later. >> we don't call them aliens. we call them c
have the trend in america where we bring the bettest and brightest from around the world, and we educate them and say thank you. >> we don't call them aliens but customers. america is such a large native market that adding more customers makes us better, more people to build things and invent things and people to actually man the factories and it's particularly stupid, sorry, particularly stupid for the american government to require us to fully educate people with phd's, and ship them out of the country and take american jobs away. >> you have to keep people with great skills and great educations that can start businesses here and you have to do a better job making sure you are raising people with those skills, and we are not doing both of those things. >> the easiest thing to do now is to keep the high-tech people in america so they don't create competitors in other countries and they create jobs and corporations here, and they can do that in a second and it chanjust takes a change in law. >> we have a phone that will be always on, and google, which basically maybe knows what i
over your shoulder. >> america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused on above all finding the information necessary to protect our people and in many cases protect our allies. >> rod is the former director of the national cyber security center. is the message here we shouldn't put anything sensitive in e-mail or online, there is no expectation for privacy in what we do in a very technology driven world? >> sure. anything you put online is definitely at risk. i'll say that. you can make some choices better than others to try protect your privacy. if you're e-mailing online you are taking a risk that could be disclosed. >> we've all done it, gone through pages and pages of conditions for new software and click accept. that's what happened in this episode. >> what are you going to do to us? >> everything you agreed to in the itunes conditions. >> we didn't read them. >> right. who just agrees to something they don't read. we get the point. a rt of people do that. we know a lot of people do every time facebook or google changes its service. so f
, billionaires have gone shopping in america's newsrooms. >> watergate brought down a president. >> have to get something on paper. >> but it made a newspaper. a triumph not just for reporters, bob woodward and carl bernstein but also for the family that owned "the washington post" lead by it's publisher kathryn graham now the legacy in the future of one of the most important newspapers rest in the hands of one billionaire, amazon found jeff b bezos. gives new meaning to the term -- >> just follow the money. >> the "post" now follows other major newspapers. "the wall street journal" bought by murdoch and "the boston globe." >> i think what people are forgetting when we're talking about billionaires taking over the media, that's not exactly new. >> william randolph everyoherst how wealth -- >> i expect to lose a million dollars next year. you know, at the rate of a million dollars a year i'll have to close this place in 60 years. >> something bezos has in common. remaking the selling the news is next. >> bezos can spend an enormous amount of money on "the washington post" without really taking t
looking over your shoulder? >> america is not interested in spying on regular people, and our focus is finding information necessary to protect our people and protect our allies. >> i want to bring in the former directeder of the national cyber security center. rod, is the message here that we shouldn't put anything sensitive in e-mail or online that there is no expectation for privacy in what we do in a very technology-driven world? >> anything you put online is definitely at risk. i will say that. you can make some choices better than others to protect your privacy, but if you are e-mailing online, you are taking the risk that can be disclosed. >> we are clicking accept, and that is what happened to kyle in an episode of "south park." listen. >> what are you going to do to us? >> everything that you agreed to in the itunes conditions. >> we didn't read them. >> right, who just agrees to something they don't read? >> we get the point. a lot of people do that. we hear a lot of buzz every time they change their terms of service, but so far there is no mass user revolt. they do it for
. and it's putting corporate america in a tough spot. there was an article for the new yorker titled why the olympic sponsors should take an action on gay rights. and richard, i want to start with you. you write the participation of corporate sponsors these companies sign deals before president putin signed that law. why do you think -- what do you think these corporate sponsors need to do now? >> i think the point is, right, that nobody wants to penalize our athletes who work so hard to succeed, and most people believe we should, therefore, participate. but the corporate sponsors, i think because they've invested so much money in the games, some of which has gone to the russian government to set up the olympics, that they have earned the right to insist that russia comply with the policies that these corporations -- most of these corporations have, for their own employees, have non-discrimination. i think they have the power of persuasion. you also have the power of threatening to withdraw their sponsorship if russia doesn't change. >> so so many of these companies, bob, they've for yea
for having me. >>> and it may not be the fear of an enemy storming america shores, but hackers promise to launch more attacks like the one that shut down t"the new york times" this week, and we will tell you what else they are targeting. that's next. [ bottle ] okay, listen up! i'm here to get the lady of the house back on her feet. [ all gasp ] oj, veggies -- you're cool. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! 'cause i'm re-workin' the menu, keeping her healthy and you on your toes. [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. i see you, cupcake! uh-oh! [ bottle ] the number one doctor recommended brand. ensure®. nutrition in charge™. then you'll love lactose-free lactaid® it's 100% real milk that's easy to digest so you can fully enjoy the dairy you love. lactaid®. for 25 years, easy to digest. easy to love. for 25 years, >>> a war half a world away is coming to a server near you. the syrian electronic army is threatening to retaliate against u.s. military strikes by attacking
1% of his personal fortune. as our jim acosta reports, billionaires have gone shopping in america's "newsroom." >> reporter: watergate brought down a president. >> have to get something on paper. >> reporter: but it made a newspaper. a triumph not just for reporters bob woodward and carl bernstein but also for the family that owned the "washington post" led by its publisher, kathryn graham, now that leg gas sin the future of one of the most important newspaper rests in the hands of one billionaire, amazon founder, jeff bezos, a stunning $250 million deal that gives an all new meaning to the term -- >> just follow the money. >> reporter: the post now follows other major newspapers. "wall street journal" bought by conservative media titan robert murdoch and "boston globe" purchased by red sox owner john henry to be snatched up by the super wealthy and perhaps the "new york times" could land in the portfolio of libertarian billi billionaires, robert and charles cope. >> i think it's not exactly new. >> reporter: william hearst came from family that made its fortune mining. the classi
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)